Expertise in the Physical Characterisation of Materials
01763 262333
MCA Services Unit 1A Long Barn, North End, Meldreth, Cambridgeshire SG8 6NT UK
01763 262333
© MCA Services
Density Measurement and Pore Volume Measurement Absolute density measurement by gas pycnometry Bulk density measurement by mercury pycnometry Total Pore Volume measurement by combination The calculation of density seems straightforward, Density = Mass / Volume. However, depending  on the method used to measure volume significantly different density values can be obtained for a sample, depending on the inclusion or exclusion of open sample pores. The distinctly different density values, may independently have profound effects on the functionality of the material. Bulk density, also termed envelope density, includes the volume of all pores within the sample. At MCA this is measured by mercury displacement using our Micromeritics AutoPore V instrument. This is available both as a single analysis option or incorporation to a full mercury porosimetry analysis. This technique allows for precise control over the pressure at which density is calculated and therefore ensures that samples are fully enveloped in mercury, yielding highly accurate bulk density values. The full mercury porosimetry analysis also includes the skeletal density of the sample together with pore size, volume and area distributions.   Absolute density, also termed true density is measured by gas displacement, usually applying helium, using a Micromeritics AccuPyc instrument. The volume of open pores is excluded from the calculation of density and so the absolute density represents that of the solid material alone. Some materials may be susceptible to helium entrapment, such as activated carbon based materials. Where this is a concern alternative gases may be applied, for example nitrogen or argon. A variety of sample cells are available allowing for most solid sample forms to be analysed, even in low quantity. The technique also allows for the calculation of closed porosity (pores with no access to the outside of the sample) through combination with theoretical density values. This is particularly useful for assessing foam and constructional materials. Total Pore Volume (TPV) can be calculated by the combination of bulk density and absolute density values and we offer this as a separate analysis option. The total pore volume of a sample is reported together with the two density values are reported for this analytical option.     
Absolute density measurement Representation of bulk density Representation of absolute density Total Pore Volume Measurement Representation of total pore volume
Expertise in the Physical Characterisation of Materials
MCA Services Unit 1A Long Barn, North End, Meldreth, Cambridgeshire SG8 6NT UK
01763 262333
© MCA Services
Density Measurement and Pore Volume Measurement Absolute density measurement by gas pycnometry Bulk density measurement by mercury pycnometry Total Pore Volume measurement by combination The calculation of density seems straightforward, Density = Mass / Volume. However, depending on the method used to measure volume significantly different density values can be obtained for a sample, depending on the inclusion or exclusion of open sample pores. The distinctly different density values, may independently have profound effects on the functionality of the material. Bulk density, also termed envelope density, includes the volume of all pores within the sample. At MCA this is measured by mercury displacement using our Micromeritics AutoPore V instrument. This is available both as a single analysis option or incorporation to a full mercury porosimetry analysis. This technique allows for precise control over the pressure at which density is calculated and therefore ensures that samples are fully enveloped in mercury, yielding highly accurate bulk density values. The full mercury porosimetry analysis also includes the skeletal density of the sample together with pore size, volume and area distributions.   Absolute density, also termed true density is measured by gas displacement, usually applying helium, using a Micromeritics AccuPyc instrument. The volume of open pores is excluded from the calculation of density and so the absolute density represents that of the solid material alone. Some materials may be susceptible to helium entrapment, such as activated carbon based materials. Where this is a concern alternative gases may be applied, for example nitrogen or argon. A variety of sample cells are available allowing for most solid sample forms to be analysed, even in low quantity. The technique also allows for the calculation of closed porosity (pores with no access to the outside of the sample) through combination with theoretical density values. This is particularly useful for assessing foam and constructional materials. Total Pore Volume (TPV) can be calculated by the combination of bulk density and absolute density values and we offer this as a separate analysis option. The total pore volume of a sample is reported together with the two density values are reported for this analytical option.     
Bulk density measurement Absolute density measurement Representation of bulk density Representation of absolute density Total Pore Volume Measurement
Representation of Total Pore Volume
01763262333